Truck Driver Errors

Most traffic accidents happen because of driver error, and truck accidents are no exception to this. Most of the time, the truck drivers are at fault. It can be argued that truck drivers should actually be more careful compared to ordinary drivers, because the vehicles they operate are much heavier and larger. It will not be wise to trigger an accident.
The website www.kff-law.com mentions that those who have been hurt in truck accidents because of somebody else’s fault, like the truck driver’s, may pursue legal action against the responsible parties, such as trying to get compensation from the damages they have sustained.
This means that truck drivers are legally obligated to operate safely. But to do so, it is important to enumerate the most common truck driving errors, so they can cautiously avoid them.

Obviously Reckless Behaviors

Doing obviously reckless behaviors while on the wheel is just unacceptable. Firstly, the behaviors are known to be dangerous already, so there is no reason for truck drivers to do them. Secondly, choosing to do the obviously reckless behavior is also negligent, because they are operating vehicles that may have high impacts during road accidents. Below are the most common behaviors that are obviously reckless:

  • Driving while fatigued, especially when intentionally doing so just to fulfil a quota or a specific task
  • Driving while under the influence of alcohol, illegal drugs, medication, and other products that may cause impairment
  • Speeding, either by going above the speed limit or driving too fast when the road and weather conditions are considered
  • Blatant disregard of traffic rules, particularly right-of-way and turning issues

Faintly Reckless Behaviors

Some reckless behaviors are not as obvious as drunk driving and speeding, but they are just as equally dangerous. Some of these behaviors drivers know to be reckless but do anyway because they are not as threatening as other reckless behaviors, while some arise from the drivers’ ignorance. Below are the most common ones:

  • Driving with excessive weight, usually in the form of too much cargo in the trailer
  • Failing to maintain the truck, making it more prone to wear and tear and defects
  • Getting too close to other vehicles, like tailgating and weaving through traffic
  • Not considering blind spots while driving, considering that trucks have wider blind spots compared to other vehicles
  • Not using turn signals, especially during turning movements in intersections

When Employer Negligence or Truck Driver Error Leads to a Preventable Accident, They Believe Those Who Suffer Deserve Just Compensation

An 18-wheeler, also called semi-truck, big rig or tractor-trailer, weighs about 80,000 lbs., making it 20-30 times heavier than a passenger car. While this weight can make this type of vehicle incredibly tough in road crashes, the same feature is source of great disadvantage where braking or coming to a full stop and many other concerns are the issue.

Compared to other vehicles, especially an ordinary passenger car which, at the speed of 65 mph, will require about 316 feet before coming to a full stop, an 18-wheeler will take 525 feet to stop fully. This longer stopping distance alone makes big rigs threats on the road. Due to this, it is very necessary that truck drivers are fully trained, licensed, not feeling fatigued or sleepy, and totally sober and focused on the road whenever behind the wheel.

While the first three necessities (mentioned above) are never or seldom problems, certainty on truck driver sobriety is still a big question. As shown in a number of studies, many truck drivers have been found intoxicated or high on drugs while driving – a very serious traffic violation due to the high risk of injury they put themselves and, especially, other motorists in.

The blood alcohol concentration (BAC) limit for drivers of passenger cars is 0.08%; for truck drivers, however, the limit is much lower: 0.04%. Semi-truck drivers with a 0.04% BAC can result to DUI, while if caught with a 0.02%BAC, they can be suspended from operating their truck for a total of 24 hours.

Truck accident lawyers from the firm Mazin & Associates, PC, know that “Heavy haul trucks are by far some of the most difficult vehicles to operate. Their large size and mass lead to numerous safety hazards, including bad brakes and large blind spots. These safety hazards only worsen when the bitter winter comes and the already limited traction of the road decreases even further. Trucks are very accident prone and when a truck accident occurs it is almost always devastating for everyone involved.

Said truck accident lawyers also understand the “necessity for heavy haul trucks to deliver goods across the country. However, when employer negligence or truck driver error leads to a preventable accident, they believe those who suffer deserve just compensation.”